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Climate and Governance Integrity

Climate and Governance Integrity (14)

Climate and Governance Integrity

Kenya’s “Integrated Programme to Build Resilience to Climate Change & Adaptive Capacity of Vulnerable Communities”, as the name suggests, seeks to enhance resilience and adaptive capacity to climate change for selected communities in various Counties in Kenya in order to improve food security and environmental management.

The programme has 5 components: food security; water management; coastal management; disaster risk reduction and knowledge management. With a total financing of USD 9,998,302 (KES 1 Billion), the total execution cost is capped at USD 804,948 (KES 81 Million), the total programme cost at USD 8,473,137 (KES 856 Million) and USD 720,217 (KES 72 Million) is set aside as the implementing fee.

Two years after its approval by the Adaptation Fund Board, the programme’s timelines have not been met. According to the programme document, the project was meant to start in July 2014 and close in July 2017 with a mid-term review in December 2015 and a terminal evaluation scheduled for September 2017. Significant delays in disbursement of the funds led to a change of timelines as a result, the start date was moved to January 2016 when the programme was launched. Up to date, some sub-executing entities are yet to sign contract agreements with their supervising Executing Entities raising questions on effective implementation of the programme and achieving the desired outcome.

From the Jubilee Government’s Manifesto, it is apparent that the administration has a raft of promises to fulfil, in a bid to transform Kenya into a middle income economy by 2030. In this regard, the Jubilee Government has prioritized power for all and protection of the environment.

Climate Governance: The missing link in climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts

By Judy Ndichu

Africa has contributed the least to the problem of climate change yet it faces some of the most severe impacts. According to Kenya’s Ministry of Environment, the evidence of climate change in the country is unmistakable. Temperatures have risen throughout the country. Rainfall has become irregular and unpredictable, and when it rains, the downpour is more intense and destructive. Extreme and harsh weather is now a norm in Kenya.

By Jacob Otachi

March 6th -7th 2012

TI-Kenya  Climate Governance and Integrity Programme was in Mombasa on Tuesday March 06 2012 to introduce the programme to Pwani Coalition for Good Governance (PCGG) and ALAC Mombasa. The aim of the programme is to promote transparency, accountability, integrity and anti-corruption safeguards in climate finance governance globally and nationally. Meeting this coalition and ALAC Mombasa was one of the methods we use to build stakeholders capacities to better engage, cooperate, advocate and contribute to climate finance governance, policy development, implementation and oversight.

A green economy —is a development which is low carbon,resource efficient and socially inclusive.It leads to —improved human well-being and social equity,while significantly reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities.
Sectors in Green Economy include:Renewable energy,—Recycling/waste management,Transport,Sustainable agriculture,Building and Forestry.

Corruption has made it into the draft outcome document!

269. We stress that fighting corruption at both the national and international levels is a priority and that corruption is a serious barrier to effective resource mobilization and allocation and diverts resources away from activities that are vital for poverty eradication, the fight against hunger and sustainable development. We are determined to take urgent and decisive steps to continue to combat corruption in all of its manifestations, which requires strong institutions at all levels, and urge all States that have not yet done so to consider ratifying or acceding to the United Nations Convention against Corruption and begin its implementation.

THIS WAS NOT IN ORIGINAL TEXT

Side-events at Rio+20 are now in full swing, ahead of the event's high-level meeting. Over the next week, thousands of civil society representatives are gathering to discuss key issues linked to sustainable development. Corruption has finally found its way into the text:

269. We stress that fighting corruption at both the national and international levels is a priority and that corruption is a serious barrier to effective resource mobilization and allocation and diverts resources away from activities that are vital for poverty eradication, the fight against hunger and sustainable development. We are determined to take urgent and decisive steps to continue to combat corruption in all of its manifestations, which requires strong institutions at all levels, and urge all States that have not yet done so to consider ratifying or acceding to the United Nations Convention against Corruption and begin its implementation.

THIS WAS NOT IN ORIGINAL TEXT

Rio+20 Earth Summit: campaigners decry final document

23 Jun 2012: 'Pathway for a sustainable future' declared, but Greenpeace says summit was failure of epic proportions

Judges for the environment: we have a crucial role to play

22 Jun 2012: Robert Carnwath: Rio+20 missed an opportunity to emphasise how people can effect real change through courts

Rio+20 summit: the final day as it happened

22 Jun 2012:Rolling news, comment and developments from the closing day of the UN conference on sustainable development in Brazil
Issues Brief 1 - Trade and Green Economy UNCSD Secretariat and UNCTAD 2011
Issues Brief 2 - Options for Strengthening IFSD: Peer Review UN-DESA 2011
Issues Brief 3 - IFSD: Issues related to an intergovernmental body on SD UN-DESA 2011
Issues Brief 4 - Oceans UN-DESA 2011
Issues Brief 5 - Sustainable Cities UN-DESA 2011
Issues Brief 6 - Current Ideas on Sustainable Development Goals and Indicators