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Press Releases

Nairobi – 16th September, 2013 –A survey by Transparency International Kenya reveals that only 17 per cent of Kenyans are aware of the amounts of money disbursed to their County Governments. The poll was conducted between August 6 and August 25, 2013.

Of these 17 per cent, less than half of the respondents (44 per cent) know where to get information on the funds disbursed to the Counties for both recurrent and development expenditure.

 

Wednesday, 28 September 2011.

Freedom of Information Day

Today we mark the freedom of information day, a day set aside to raise awareness about the right to freedom of information, held by the Government.

The Constitution of Kenya

The right to access to information has been recognized in Kenya’s Constitution under Article 35. The President of Kenya, Mwai Kibaki and Prime Minister, Raila Odinga have on several occasions reiterated their support for freedom of information.

In spite of this, Kenya does not have an access to information law. Although such a law will play a critical role in fighting corruption and promoting transparency, accountability and public participation, it has not received the priority it requires.

A freedom of information law will play the distinct role of providing procedure to acquire information such as those on devolved funds, budget information and address complaints, and exemptions within the law.

Nairobi Thursday 1st December 2011: Kenya has been placed at position 154 out of 182; this is according to the Corruption Perception Index (CPI) 2011 launched today in Berlin. Kenya has recorded negligible improvement from a score of 2.1 in 2010 to 2.2 in the 2011 index in a scale of zero to ten (zero indicating a high levels of corruption perception and 10 showing low levels of corruption perception). The CPI 2011 surveyed 182 countries compared to 178 in the 2010. This is an indication that reforms catalyzed by the new constitution have not yielded dividends in the fight against corruption. The ongoing Judicial and intended Police reforms hold the possibility for progress. However comprehensive reforms in the public sector are needed, especially the legal services sector. The lack of progress in tackling graft can still be attributed to lack of political will and the slow pace of reforms in critical sectors, despite implementation of the Constitution. Kenya is among the 27 lowest-scoring countries in the company of countries widely perceived as endemically corrupt or failed.

 

Nairobi, Kenya, Saturday, 7th January 2012: TI-Kenya is disappointed with the process of recruitment of Commissioners to the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (EACC). The process is highly flawed and stands no chance whatsoever of giving Kenya a credible Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission. The process has been marred with controversy and no longer commands the respect and trust of the people of Kenya. The recruitment should therefore be immediately terminated and a new one commenced without further delay.

TI-Kenya considers the vote on the report of the Parliamentary Committee on Justice and Legal Affairs that divided Parliament right through the middle as a vote of no confidence in the process and the candidates so nominated. Important issues were raised in Parliament such as the failure or omission by the executive to give reasons for the rejection of the highest scoring candidates, issues of ethnicity and the lack of demonstrable interest in anti-corruption and governance issues. Any commissioners (or Commission) appointed with such issues hanging over their credibility will suffer a crisis of confidence that will be difficult to overcome.

Nairobi, Kenya, Thursday, 12th January 2012: The civil society is disappointed with the process of recruitment of Commissioners to the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (EACC). The process is highly flawed and stands no chance of giving Kenya a credible Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission. The recruitment should therefore be immediately terminated and a new one commenced without further delay. We consider the vote on the report of the Parliamentary Committee on Justice and Legal Affairs that divided Parliament right through the middle as a vote of no confidence in the process and the candidates so nominated. Important issues were raised in Parliament such as the failure or omission by the executive to give reasons for the rejection of the highest scoring candidates, issues of ethnicity and the lack of demonstrable interest in anti-corruption and governance issues.

Nairobi Monday, March 5th, 2012- Ethnicity and political euphoria may have little impact in the next general elections, according to an opinion poll on the ‘State of Governance in Kenya’ conducted by Transparency International-Kenya.According to the survey, there is a high level of public expectation for honesty and a clean development record among aspiring leaders with 77% of the respondents reporting that they will consider these two values in casting their votes; 15.7% said they will consider election pledges while 4% cited the ethnicity of a candidate as a key factor in selecting leaders.

The opinion poll was conducted with the implementation of the Constitution, anticipated general elections and impending International Criminal Court (ICC) trials on the 2007/2008 post-election violence in mind. These three processes have without doubt placed key governance institutions under a sharp spotlight, ignited Kenya’s political temperature and catalysed political formations.

The opinion poll aimed to evaluate: the perceived changes in governance practices in Kenya since the adoption of the Constitution; anti-corruption efforts; factors that are likely to influence voting patterns in the next general elections and the impact of the ICC process on the forthcoming elections and Kenya in general.

THE SPEAKER AND PARLIAMENTARY SERVICE COMMISSION MUST CHECK CLAIMS OF IMPROPRIETY BY MPS

24th April 2012, Nairobi, Kenya: Allegations that Members of Parliament are abusing their positions for personal gain at the expense of the public are extremely disturbing and raise fundamental accountability and transparency concerns. The Speaker and the Parliamentary Service Commission should move quickly to act on these allegations and punish anyone found to be abusing their positions. Members should not use parliamentary privilege to escape liability.

Reports that Members of Parliament awarded themselves Kshs 3.7 million each in gratuity in exchange for defeating amendments to the Finance Bill 2011 aimed at curbing high bank interest rates, is yet another demonstration that public interest matters least to majority of Kenya’s legislators. Such payment will be an unnecessary additional burden to the already overburdened Kenyan taxpayer. It is unacceptable that Members of Parliament continue to enjoy hefty untaxed allowances and benefits without sharing equitably in the burden of generating it. The self-award also goes against the rules of natural justice and severely compromises the principles of good governance by an institution that should be the custodian of such principles and undermines the role of the Salaries and Remuneration Commission.

Reforming public contracting: Giving Kenyans value for money

Nairobi, Kenya: Monday, June 18th, 2012 – The performance of public contracts in Kenya has, for decades, dominated public debate on financial accountability. The success of public projects is determined by a well defined contractual process of competitive bidding that seeks to protect the public against the squandering of public funds and prevents abuses such as fraud, favouritism and extravagance. Corruption is further compounded by the lack of information and the veil of bureaucracy donned by public institutions. Kenya has similarly continued to score poorly in the global corruption perception reports.

It is against this background that a pioneer multi-stakeholder group - Contract Monitoring Kenya Network (CMKN)1 was established to empower citizens to hold public authorities accountable and to espouse transparency and accountability in public contracting. The network was officially launched today. Similar networks have been launched in Zambia, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Nigeria, Ghana, Sierra Leone and Liberia through the support of the World Bank Institute

The move by Members of Parliament to introduce amendments to the Finance Bill 2011 effectively awarding themselves a hefty Ksh 2.1 Billion severance package is extremely disturbing and unfortunate and in direct conflict with the constitutional mandate of the Salaries and Remuneration Commission established in article 230 of the Constitution of Kenya.

We note with great concern this pattern of Kenyan Members of Parliament in continuing to flout the law, this time disregarding the essence of the Salaries & Remuneration Commission. We are also deeply concerned that Members of Parliament and the Parliamentary Service Commission have abused their privileges and disregarded all rules of decency and conflict of interestand make a mockery of the letter and spirit of the Constitution.

PRESS RELEASE

Nairobi – 19th November 2012 –A survey by Transparency International Kenya and Trade Mark East Africa (TMEA) reveals that regulatory authorities in East Africa demand the highest amount of bribes from transporters and drivers along the transport corridors.

According to the report titled Bribery as a non-tariff barrier to trade; a case study of East African trade corridors, Tanzania’s regulatory authorities ranked worst at USD 12, 640 (Kshs. 1,074,400) followed by Kenya at USD6, 715 (Kshs. 570,775), Uganda was third at USD3, 672 (Kshs.312, 120) while Rwanda ranked fourth at USD 679 (Kshs. 57,715) and Burundi had the lowest at USD293 (Kshs. 24,905).

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